Search Results for africa

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African Free School, First in America for Black Students, Found a Home in Greenwich Village

…Rights and Social Justice Map. Want to learn about more civil rights and social justice sites in our neighborhoods? Check out our map. Sources: https://www.nyhistory.org/web/africanfreeschool/history/ https://www.nyhistory.org/web/africanfreeschool/history/philosophy.html http://cdm16694.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/ref/collection/p15052coll5/id/31512 http://www.aaregistry.org/historic_events/view/african-free-school-opens-new-york-city https://www.jstor.org/stable/274931?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents http://maap.columbia.edu/place/9…

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African Free School #3, 120 West 3rd Street

…as a licensed doctor; Henry Highland Garnet, a leading abolitionist and the first African American to address Congress; Ira Aldridge, the most famous African American actor of his era; Mathematician,…

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The African Grove Theater

James Hewlett as Richard III in a c. 1821 production. Hewlett, an actor who got his start at the African Grove Theater, was one of the most famous African-American actors…

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Sarah Smith Garnet: Suffragist, Principal, Villager

…in Village history when a robust African-American neighborhood, called “Little Africa,” was centered around Minetta Street and Lane and surrounding blocks. Garnet, deeply rooted in both her Brooklyn and Village communities,…

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Black History Month: Alex Haley

African-American, and resulted in approximately one-fifth of the city’s African-American population leaving (mostly for Brooklyn) To view them all, and to see other sites connected to LGBT Civil rights history,…

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Henry Highland Garnet and the Village

…worked hard to fight for himself and the African-American community, eventually becoming the first African-American to address the United States House of Representatives. He also at one time resided at…

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On This Day: New York City Draft Riots

…was home to Irish and German immigrants and African Americans. In five days of rioting, mobs lynched at least a dozen African American men, destroyed draft offices, burned and looted…

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Richard Wright in Greenwich Village

…first African American authors to protest the treatment of black Americans by white Americans, and would greatly influence an entire generation of African American writers. Iconic works such as Native…

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Civil Rights History at 92 Grove Street

…struggle, but illustrates the same race-based violence African Americans faced across the centuries. In July 1863, angry white working-class New Yorkers began a protest against the new federal draft that…

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Why Isn’t This Landmarked? 70 Fifth Avenue

…for the Abolition of Capital Punishment. From 1914 until the mid-1920s, no. 70 Fifth Avenue housed the headquarters of the oldest and largest national African-American civil rights organization, the NAACP….

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Interior Artwork of Our Lady of Pompeii Church

…Revival church first built in 1836 for the Third Universalist Society at 210 Bleecker Street. The area was then a predominantly African-American neighborhood known as “Little Africa“. Originally erected by…

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Immigration and the Village

…to America annually after 1924. This playbill from the African Grove Theatre on Bleecker and Mercer Streets is a reminder that immigrants and migrants brought a wealth of culture to…

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Tenements of the South Village

…laboratory and cross-section of tenement types which served as the homes for much of NYC’s African American community in the 19th century as well as many of the city’s immigrants before…

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What’s in a name? Gay Street

…connections to gay liberation and the African-American struggle for freedom, the history behind the name is a little murkier, and a little more complicated to unravel, than one might expect. Northward…

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31 Literary Icons of Greenwich Village

…large apartment building at 15 Charles Street. Wright’s work largely concerns the treatment of African Americans in the United States. He was one of the first African American authors to protest…

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The Lives of Writers #SouthOfUnionSquare

…organized the Harlem Suitcase Theater. Led by IWO vice president and Harlem resident Louise Thompson Patterson, the organization sought to bring socially conscious theater to African American audiences throughout the…

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The Empress of Blues, South of Union Square

…Joplin to Anita Baker. Her songs spoke to and about working people, African Americans, liberated women, and their (and anyone else’s) everyday troubles. Her “spoken word” style is considered to…

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