Greenwich Village Historic District Past Campaign Updates

Latest Landmarks Applications Available

Village Preservation provides an ongoing record of all applications for changes to landmarked properties in our neighborhoods (Greenwich Village, NoHo, Gansevoort Market, the South Village, and the East Village) that require a public hearing before they can be approved. These proposals range from minor alterations to large additions, demolition, and new construction on landmarked sites. Find out about the application, when the Community Board and NYC Landmarks Preservation Commission public hearings will take place, and how you can weigh in before decisions are made. You can also sign up for alerts to be notified of changes in the status of the application.

View the new upcoming applications:

May 9, 2022

Updated and Redesigned Report Released: New Buildings Approved for Construction in the Greenwich Village Historic District Since Designation in 1969

April 29 of this week marks the anniversary in 1969 of the designation of the Greenwich Village Historic District — the city’s largest and one of its first landmarked districts, which protects much of our neighborhood. Village Preservation is releasing an updated and redesigned version of our report “New Buildings Approved for Construction in the Greenwich Village Historic District Since Designation in 1969” — access it here. The report shows every building approved for construction in the city’s largest historic district since designation. Some were never built. Some are now neighborhood classics. Some sparked enormous controversy, and still do. Some will make you wonder “what were they thinking?” 

In all cases, however, it’s valuable to see when, where, and how new buildings were approved in the landmark district over the last 53 years, especially since the city keeps no record of this information.

As we approach the anniversary of the landmark designation of this district at the heart of our neighborhood, you can explore the Greenwich Village Historic District’s incomparable history and architecture through various resources we provide. You can see “then and now” pictures of all 2,300 buildings in the Greenwich Village Historic District in the 1960s prior to designation and now, and take dozens of themed tours of the district’s history and architecture on our interactive Greenwich Village Historic District Map. You can also read dozens of entries on our blog about significant figures and places in the district. And there are many more ways to learn more about and explore the Greenwich Village Historic District on our website.

April 25, 2022

Latest Landmarks Applications Available

Village Preservation provides an ongoing record of all applications for changes to landmarked properties in our neighborhoods (Greenwich Village, NoHo, Gansevoort Market, the South Village, and the East Village) that require a public hearing before they can be approved. These proposals range from minor alterations to large additions, demolition, and new construction on landmarked sites. Find out about the application, when the Community Board and NYC Landmarks Preservation Commission public hearings will take place, and how you can weigh in before decisions are made. You can also sign up for alerts to be notified of changes in the status of the application.

View the new upcoming applications:

April 6, 2022

Oversized and Out-of-Context Development Plans for 15 Greenwich Avenue, 182 Spring Street Get Landmarks Review Next Tuesday

Two proposals for oversized and out-of-context new developments in landmarked districts in our neighborhoods will go before the Landmarks Preservation Commission next Tuesday — 182-86 Spring Street in the Sullivan Thompson Historic District and 15 Greenwich Avenue (Christopher/10th Streets) in the Greenwich Village Historic District. Both designs were rejected by the local community board, and 15 Greenwich Avenue is appearing before the Commission for a second time after changes.

New construction is allowed in historic districts on sites that do not contain historically or architecturally significant buildings. However, the design of new buildings must be deemed “appropriate” for the context of their historic district, and these two designs (view here and here) fall well short of that mark. Both are attempts by developers to squeeze the largest new construction they can get away with onto these sites, compromising the integrity of their surroundings.

TO HELP:

October 15, 2021

‘Manhattan Promenade’: The Plan for Adaptive Reuse of the High Line ca. 1979, and Other New Historic Images

High Line looking north up Washington Street at Little West 12th Street.jpg

We’re proud to share with the public new historic images and materials from a 1979 proposal by Greenwich Village architect Noah Greenberg to turn the abandoned West Side Elevated Rail Line that ran through his neighborhood into a “park in the sky” called “Manhattan Promenade.” While the proposal was well received at the time, it of course never came to fruition; it would not be until 30 years later that the reimagined railway would open to the public as the High Line.

Incredible images of and from the abandoned railway in 1979 have been added to our Historic Image Archive; the full original 1979 proposal for adaptive reuse, with text, map, and pictures, has been added to our Preservation History Archive.

Cable Building, 1910

We’ve also recently added to our Historic Image Archive nearly 20 new historic images culled from recent landmarks applications, from the 19th and early 20th centuries, of buildings along St. Luke’s Place, Bleecker Street, Houston and Broadway, and more. 

October 15, 2021

Latest Landmark Applications: 69 Gansevoort Street, 3 Clarkson Street, 657 Greenwich Street, 118 Greenwich Avenue, 15 Greenwich Avenue

Village Preservation provides an ongoing record of all applications for changes to landmarked properties in our neighborhoods (Greenwich Village, NoHo, Gansevoort Market, the South Village, and the East Village) that require a public hearing before they can be approved. These proposals range from minor alterations to large additions, demolition, and new construction on landmarked sites. Find out about the application, when the Community Board and NYC Landmarks Preservation Commission public hearings will take place, and how you can weigh in before decisions are made. You can also sign up for alerts to be notified of changes in the status of the application.

View the new upcoming applications:

15 Greenwich Avenue - New LPC Application - Screen Shot

September 16, 2021

Latest Landmark Applications: 15 Greenwich Avenue, 23 8th Avenue, 548 Hudson Street

Village Preservation provides an ongoing record of all applications for changes to landmarked properties in our neighborhoods (Greenwich Village, NoHo, Gansevoort Market, the South Village, and the East Village) that require a public hearing before they can be approved. These proposals range from minor alterations to large additions, demolition, and new construction on landmarked sites. Find out about the application, when the Community Board and NYC Landmarks Preservation Commission public hearings will take place, and how you can weigh in before decisions are made. You can also sign up for alerts to be notified of changes in the status of the application.

View the new upcoming applications:

August 10, 2021

Proposed New Building Design for 15 Greenwich Avenue in Historic District Must Go

The existing one-story building (left) and the proposed six-story replacement.

Village Preservation strongly opposes the design for a proposed new six-story building at 15 Greenwich Avenue in the Greenwich Village Historic District, which will be considered by the Landmarks Preservation Commission next Tuesday, July 20. The monotonous, single-pane windowed, concrete paneled design bears no relationship to the surrounding historic buildings or district, and should not be approved.  

If you’d like to testify in person at the hearing, click here for information on how to do so (approximate time of hearing for this item on the Tuesday calendar won’t be available until Friday).

July 15, 2021

LPC Rules 6-5 To Approve 14-16 Fifth Avenue Demolition and New (Shorter) Tower

In a highly unusual split vote decided by the Landmarks Preservation Commission Chair, on Tuesday the LPC voted by the slimmest of margins to approve demolition of the historic, landmarked 170+-year-old building at 14-16 Fifth Avenue and replace it with a 213-ft-tall tower. This was incredibly disappointing given the clearly established historic significance of this building (demolition of not-historically significant buildings within historic districts is allowed), the troubling precedent allowing its demolition would set, and the outpouring of support for saving the building from thousands of New Yorkers, prominent scholars and writers, and Council Speaker Corey Johnson, Borough President Gale Brewer, State Senator Brad Hoylman, and Assemblymember Deborah Glick.

The original proposed 367-ft-tall tower (left); the final, approved 213-ft-tall tower (right).

We’re deeply grateful for the support from five of eleven members of the Commission, who passionately opposed demolition, and can take pride in the fact that our collective efforts resulted in several substantial reductions in the oversized height of the building, from the original 367 ft to the final 213 ft — a 42% decrease. But there can be no excusing the Commission’s decision to approve the erasure of history, as well as the demolition of 20 units of housing for longtime residents, half of which were affordable rent regulated units, to be replaced by a high rise pier-a-terre for the super rich with fewer units of housing than the modest but historic building that will be replaced by a developer with a less-than-stellar track record.

Read press coverage here and here.

May 13, 2021

City Council Third District Candidates Forum Monday at 6 pm — RSVP Now

This Monday evening, Village Preservation will be holding a forum with candidates for the Third City Council District, currently occupied by term-limited City Councilmember Corey Johnson. This forum will be a unique opportunity to hear from candidates about preservation, development, and planning issues in our neighborhood, and how they will deal with them as city councilmember. Candidates so far confirmed are Leslie Boghosian Murphy, Erik Bottcher, Marni Halasa, Arthur Schwartz, and Aleta LaFargue. There will be an opportunity for questions from the public moderated by Village Preservation. 

The City Council plays an enormously important role in land use, development, and preservation issues, particularly on the local level. They are local neighborhoods’ advocates and representatives to the city government. Village Preservation will also be holding candidate forums for the 1st and 2nd council districts (East Village, NoHo, parts of Greenwich Village) in conjunction with fellow community and preservation groups. 

Educate yourself and ensure your voice is heard!

May 6, 2021

Remembering Jane Jacobs on Her Birthday

Jane Jacobs would have turned 105 this Tuesday. An early member of our Board of Advisors and instigator of a radical rethinking of what made cities and neighborhood work, Jane remains an inspiration to us and our work. She helped save the West Village and SoHo from destruction, got cars out of Washington Square, and showed how communities typically know what they need better than distant bureaucrats and profit-driven developers. Each year her birthday is celebrated across the globe with Jane’s Walks, in which communities celebrate and engage places that are special to them.

Jane Jacobs at protest outside P.S. 41, © Estate of Fred W. McDarrah, from our historic archive

For us, continuing Jane’s legacy is a year-round affair, as we fight against plans large and small by City Hall and Big Real Estate to destroy or exploit our neighborhoods. We also work to keep alive a record of her words, deeds, and impact. Here’s a few ways you can too:

May 6, 2021

City Council District 3 Candidates Forum Monday, May 10

Village Preservation will be holding a forum with candidates for the Third City Council District, currently occupied by term-limited City Councilmember Corey Johnson (district map here). This will be a unique opportunity to hear from candidates about preservation, development, and planning issues in our neighborhood, and how they will deal with them as city councilmember. Candidates so far confirmed are Leslie Boghosian Murphy, Erik Bottcher, Marni Halasa, and Arthur Schwartz (pictured above from left to right). There will be an opportunity for questions from the public moderated by Village Preservation. 

The City Council plays an enormously important role in land use, development, and preservation issues, particularly on the local level. They are local neighborhoods’ advocates and representatives to the city government. Village Preservation will also be holding candidate forums for the 1st and 2nd council districts (East Village, NoHo, parts of Greenwich Village) in conjunction with fellow community and preservation groups. 

Educate yourself and ensure your voice is heard!
April 30, 2021